For more information, please contact Mr. Inder Singh at:

Indian American Cultural and Educational Association

  3818 Gleneagles Drive
Tarzana, California 91356
Phone: (818) 708-3885

 

 

As an Individual, please use the following SAMPLE letter:

August 12, 2004

Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee
c/o U.S. Postal Service, Stamp Services
173 5 North Lynn Street, Suite 5013
Arlington, Virginia 22209

Subject: Commemorative stamp for first Asian Congressman Late Dalip S. Saund

Dear Sirs,


I fully support the request of Indian American Heritage Foundation/Congressman Joe Wilson for the issuance of a commemorative stamp for the late Congressman Dalip S. Saund, the first Asian American elected to the US Congress in 1956 from 29th congressional district of California.

Dr. Saund fought many battles, the first one to get U.S. citizenship for Indian nationals. He had come from India, natives of which were not eligible to U.S. citizenship. With his initiative and help of some Asian Indians in California and some Indian groups in New York, Congresswoman Clare Booth Luce and Congressman Emanuel Cellar were convinced to jointly introduce a bill in the Congress, which after a long and hard struggle was passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Truman on July 3, 1946.

Dr. Dalip S. Saund, on becoming naturalized citizen started taking more active role in the political process of his adopted homeland. In June 1950, he ran for a seat on the Imperial County Democratic Central Committee and won his first political battle. In the general election in November 1950, he was elected as Judge in Westmorland due to his exemplary grassroots campaign. But the judgeship was denied to him, as he had not been a citizen for one full year by Election Day. In 1952, he ran against the incumbent and won. Dr. Saund served as judge for four years until his election to the Congress of the United States.

In October 1955, Judge Saund became a candidate from the 29th Congressional district and won the primary with a tremendous majority. In the general election, Saund faced a highly celebrated opponent who had rich supporters and was personal friend of the then President of the United States. But Saund carried out an intensive campaign of registration of voters, passed out thousands of “Saund circulars”, visited thousands of homes with the help of dedicated volunteers and thus made a definite impact on voters. His hard work did pay off in the general election, in 1956. The “first native of Asia” was elected to the United States Congress.

Today, the population of Asian Americans in the United States, is in excess of 10 million. Yet Asian Americans, and particularly Indian Americans, seeking political office invoke Saund’s name, much the same way, as Saund himself invoked President Lincoln’s name. Like him, he is a source of inspiration and a worthy role model to look up to.

Dr. Dalip S. Saund with a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkley, started as farm hand but rose to become U.S. Congressman on November 6, 1956. The fiftieth anniversary of that historic event falls on November 6, 2006. I therefore urge you to issue a commemorative stamp for the first Asian Congressman, late Dr. Dalip Singh Saund.

Yours Sincerely,

___________________________________
Signature and name in capital letters
_______________________________
Street Address
___________________________________
City, State, Zip code
___________________________________
Telephone, Email

 

As an organization, please use the following SAMPLE letter on your
organization's letterhead
:

August 12, 2004

Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee
c/o U.S. Postal Service, Stamp Services
173 5 North Lynn Street, Suite 5013
Arlington, Virginia 22209

Subject: Commemorative stamp for first Asian Congressman Late Dalip S. Saund

Dear Sirs,

We, the board members of ------------------------------------ fully support the request of Indian American Heritage Foundation/Congressman Joe Wilson for the issuance of a commemorative stamp for the late Congressman Dalip S. Saund, the first Asian American elected to the US Congress in 1956 from 29th congressional district of California.

Dr. Saund fought many battles, the first one to get U.S. citizenship for the Indian nationals. He had come from India, natives of which were not eligible to U.S. citizenship. With his initiative and help of some Asian Indians in California and some Indian groups in New York, Congresswoman Clare Booth Luce and Congressman Emanuel Cellar were convinced to jointly introduce a bill in the Congress, which after a long and hard struggle was passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Truman on July 3, 1946.

Dr. Dalip S. Saund, on becoming naturalized citizen started taking more active role in the political process of his adopted homeland. In June 1950, he ran for a seat on the Imperial County Democratic Central Committee and won his first political battle. In the general election in November 1950, he was elected as Judge in Westmorland due to his exemplary grassroots campaign. But the judgeship was denied to him, as he had not been a citizen for one full year by Election Day. In 1952, he ran against the incumbent and won. Dr. Saund served as judge for four years until his election to the Congress of the United States.

In October 1955, Judge Saund became a candidate from the 29th Congressional district and won the primary with a tremendous majority. In the general election, Saund faced a highly celebrated opponent who had rich supporters and was personal friend of the then President of the United States. But Saund carried out an intensive campaign of registration of voters, passed out thousands of “Saund circulars”, visited thousands of homes with the help of dedicated volunteers and thus made a definite impact on voters. His hard work did pay off in the general election, in 1956. The “first native of Asia” was elected to the United States Congress.

Today, the population of Asian Americans in the United States, is in excess of 10 million. Yet Asian Americans, and particularly Indian Americans, seeking political office invoke Saund’s name, much the same way, as Saund himself invoked President Lincoln’s name. Like him, he is a source of inspiration and a worthy role model to look up to.

Dr. Dalip S. Saund with a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkley, started as farm hand but rose to become U.S. Congressman on November 6, 1956. The fiftieth anniversary of that historic event falls on November 6, 2006. I therefore urge you to issue a commemorative stamp for the first Asian Congressman, late Dr. Dalip Singh Saund.


Yours Sincerely,

_________________________________
Signature , title and name in capital letters
_______________________________
Organization Name
___________________________________
Street Address, City, State, Zip code
___________________________________
Telephone, Email